Monday 19 August 2024
Stage 1
SARREBOURG - (CC. Sarrebourg Moselle Sud)   RONCHAMP-CHAMPAGNEY (Département de la Haute-Saône)

Distance 185 km
Prologue
Distance

185 km (115 mi)

Climbing
n/a
Type
Délais

15%

of the winner’s time
GPX file  Download
Timetable (estimated)
n/a

SARREBOURG - (CC. Sarrebourg Moselle Sud)

RONCHAMP-CHAMPAGNEY (Département de la Haute-Saône)

  • KM 47.1
    Sprint de Baccarat
  • KM 133.4
    Col du Ménil
  • KM 144.1
    Col des Croix
Rider Gaps
4
5
Rider Gaps
2
3
4
5
n/a
For the stage:
  • Yellow Jersey
    n/a
  • Polka dot jersey
    n/a
  • Green jersey
    n/a
  • White jersey
    n/a
  • Stage victory
    n/a
  • Combativity prize
    n/a
  • Team classification
    n/a
Team Gaps
1
2
3

The longest stage of the Tour de l’Avenir 2023 (195km plus 12km to the actual start) was open to the sprinters and they didn’t miss a beat.
It was close, very close, but the verdict was in favour of Canada’s Riley Pickrell at the expense of Poland’s Fratczak, who perhaps made the mistake of cutting in too early.
However, the Poles found more than a consolation with the yellow jersey now on the shoulders of Michal Pomorski, the beneficiary of his presence in the breakaway who had maintained a slender advantage of 6 seconds on the first day.

It has to be said that his predecessor, Danish rider Andres Foldager, winner of stage 1, had embarked on a long breakaway in the company of young Alexandre Vinokourov and for longer with Slovenian rider Alijaz Turk as his only support. An operation that was clearly doomed to failure. This rather rare situation of a yellow jersey being launched in an off-road operation obviously had consequences, as Foldager was to pay for his efforts and finished very late, more than 7 minutes behind in a final that was also marked by breaks following a crash.

The third stage between Vatan and Issoudun, in the Indre region, should reshuffle the cards as it is contested in the form of a 26.5km team time trial.

-- END --

At the crossroads of Strasbourg, Nancy and Metz, this vast territory of ponds and forests, plains and mountains, is characterized by the variety of its attractions. You can enjoy hiking through magnificent natural areas, from riverbanks to valleys, from steep paths to panoramic ridges. You can also follow themed trails that highlight the area’s environment and history. The rich architectural, religious and industrial heritage bears witness to local history and adds charm to the landscape. 

Locals and visitors alike can choose from a wide range of water sports, including river boating. Cycling is no exception, from track cycling to mountain biking. Quality local produce enriches the region’s gastronomy. Cultural attractions include the Musée du Pays de Sarrebourg and the Chapelle des Cordeliers, with its monumental stained-glass window by Chagall. There are also three tourist highlights: the Parc Animalier de Sainte-Croix, Center Parcs Les Trois Forêts and the Train Forestier d’Abreschviller.

Ronchamp is a French commune located in the Haute-Saône department, the Franche-Comté cultural and historical region and the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté administrative region. It is the seat of the Rahin et Chérimont community of communes.

With a population of 2,847 in 2021, the commune comprises a town center and several hamlets in the particularly hilly Vosges Saônoises region. Altitudes range from 353 meters in the town center to 790 meters in the Arobert forest. The town is crossed by the Rahin and two other smaller rivers: the Rhien and the Beuveroux. Ronchamp’s territory was occupied by a Gallic tribe as early as the 4th century BC. The first mention of the present-day town and its castle dates back to the 13th century. Ronchamp was deeply affected by the Second World War, and was awarded the Croix de Guerre 1939-1945 on November 11, 1948.

At the heart of the modest Ronchamp and Champagney mining basin, Ronchamp is known for its rich industrial past of coal mining. Coal was mined here from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, providing a major boost to the local economy and shaping a significant architectural and landscape heritage (mine shafts, slag heaps, mining towns and various buildings). This period was marked by the large-scale immigration of Polish miners who came to work in the mines in the 1920s. Eleven shafts have been identified in Ronchamp, two of which have become tourist sites: the Sainte-Marie shaft with its headframe and the Etançon shaft, which is part of the historical and mining circuit of outcrops, along with other relics. The Marcel-Maulini Mine Museum was created in 1976 to retrace the history of the mine. The town’s most famous monument is the Notre-Dame du Haut chapel, one of the major works of sacred architecture of the 20th century. Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, it was built in stone and concrete between 1953 and 1955 to designs by the Franco-Swiss architect Le Corbusier, on top of the Bourlémont hill (474 m) overlooking the town center.

The commune is also classified as a “station verte”, an eco-tourism label, and is a member of the Association des Communes Minières de France.

For over 12 years, Haute-Saône has been leading the way! With 6 arrivals and 1 departure of the Tour de France, the first final arrival of the Tour de France Femmes in 2022 and numerous cycling events every year, Haute-Saône is a land of cycling. The department, as leader, has chosen to develop the Voie Bleue (V50) cycle route linking Luxembourg to Lyon, along the entire length of the Saône, a total of 140 km from the north to the south of the department. Other itineraries structure the region: the V50 link with EuroVélo 6, which runs along the Doubs via the Courlis trail, Vesoul and the Chemin Vert, as well as the V50 link with the Plateau des Mille Etangs via Luxeuil-les-Bains, not to mention the 21 departmental cycle loops. Haute-Saône has what it takes to satisfy tourists in search of authenticity: a varied, accessible and remarkable cultural and archaeological heritage, unspoilt nature and quality services.